Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
height
20 to 24 inches
weight
50 to 60 pounds
life span
10 to 14 years
group
Sporting Dogs
Adapts Well to Apartment Living
Good For Novice Owners
Sensitivity Level
Tolerates Being Alone
Tolerates Cold Weather
Tolerates Hot Weather
Affectionate with Family
Incredibly Kid Friendly Dogs
Dog Friendly
Friendly Toward Strangers
Amount Of Shedding
Drooling Potential
Easy To Groom
General Health
Potential For Weight Gain
Size
Easy To Train
Intelligence
Potential For Mouthiness
Prey Drive
Tendency To Bark Or Howl
Wanderlust Potential
Energy Level
Intensity
Exercise Needs
Potential For Playfulness

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, also known as the Korthals Griffon and Russian Setter originated from France. This breed is part of the UKC, Gun Dog Group, and the AKC, Sporting Dog Group. It was developed as a versatile hunting dog in the mid-to late nineteenth century by the son of a Dutch banker named Eduard Korthals. This breed is nicknamed the “supreme gundog.”

Brief History

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon dog breed originated in France. It is thought that the German Shorthair, Barbet, Small Munsterlander, Otterhound, and the Braque Francais were all bred together resulting in the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon. This breed could work as a pointer on dry land, and also as an exceptional water retriever. It is a dog breed with webbed toes especially for swimming.

This breed was refined in Germany by Korthals, who then refined them again in France. People are still not sure as to whether the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is a French or Dutch dog breed. This dog breed was first imported in to the U.S in 1887.

Physical Description

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Stay

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is a medium-sized dog breed. It is longer than it is tall. With a square head, the skull and muzzle are equal in length. This dog breed has a mustache and eyebrows. The ears are drop ears of medium size, and the nose is brown. The eyes are large and of a yellow to brown color. They are friendly, alert, and very intelligent. The nose is brown. This breed has a tail that is docked from one–half to one-third its length. The tail is carried straight or slight upright. The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon has a downy undercoat with a wiry and rough straight outercoat. The rough outercoat offers protection in rough terrain and brush. The coat is never wooly or curly. The coat color is either steel gray with brown markings; chestnut brown; roan, brown, and white; or orange and white. Feet are round and firm with tightly closed, webbed toes. This dog breed is friendly, fast, and exceptionally easy to train. It covers ground effortlessly, and is of medium-speed.

Temperament

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is an intelligent, easygoing, and friendly dog breed. This dog breed gets bored easily. It is a breed that is easy to train. The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is always willing to please, and is trustworthy and loyal. This dog breed makes for an exceptional family dog, that also is outstanding as a hunting companion. As with any dog breed, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon benefits from early socialization, and positive dog training commencing during puppyhood.

Gun dogs are the best family dogs. The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, being a sporting dog were bred to accompany hunters out in the field, and to work together with other people and dogs. It is for this reason that this dog breed is a wonderful addition to any family. They love the outdoors, and being part of a family outing.

This breed makes for the ultimate hiking or camping companion. They are also great boating companions because they love the water so much. These are gentle dogs, with the easiest disposition, yet are super bright and active.

Special Needs

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon does well with positive dog training, and socialization starting from puppyhood. This dog breed needs to have an activity, and lots of regular exercise. Some gun dogs may be more intense, and do not calm down until after being exercised substantially. They will have boundless energy, and tremendous enthusiasm to play, interact and generally have fun with everyone. This puppy like energy may make them anxious, if not exercised properly. The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is not a sedentary type dog breed, and do not do well with apartment living. This breed needs to be out and about on farms, large equestrian properties, or homes with large gardens. They have an uncurbed need for play and exercise.

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon dog breed is bred from a field line, and tend to be more agile with a stronger work drive to hunt. This dog breed is easy to train, and is very gentle with people and children. They make for wonderful household companions, as long as they are exercised and positively trained and socialized.

Possible Health Concerns

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is an active dog breed that may be susceptible to the following health conditions:

  • Hip Dysplasia: is a hereditary condition that may affect WPG’s. HD is an abnormal development of the hip joint in medium and large dog breeds. It is generally characterized by a loose joint, and then degenerative joint disease. WPG’s should be fed a high-quality diet that is geared towards their life stage. Puppies should only be fed high-quality puppy dog food. Excessive growth, types of exercise, nutritional factors, and hereditary factors all come in to play with hip dysplasia. Consult with your veterinarian for expert advice.
  • Bloat: This breed is deep- chested, and thus more prone to bloat. Bloat is a life threatening emergency. It is caused by the twisting of the stomach, together with the accumulation of gas, with or without fluid. It is best to never elevate your dog’s water and food bowls. Stress is also a major factor in causing bloat. Avoid feed your dogs a large meal, followed by vigorous exercise. At the first signs of dry vomiting, restlessness and discomfort, contact your emergency veterinarian. Don’t wait for a few hours. This is a true emergency that is life-threatening!
  • Diabetes: WPG’s have an above than average risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes occurs when the body is unable to regulate the metabolism of sugars resulting in the need of insulin injections. Symptoms are increased thirst, increased urination, and increased hunger. Consult with your veterinarian for advice if your WPG has any of these symptoms.
  • Eye Problems: WPG’S can inherit eye problems, some of which may result in blindness.
  • Entropion: This is an eye condition in the WPG that occurs when the eyelid rolls inward causing the eyelid to rub against the cornea. This is a very painful condition, and can lead to blindness. This is a heritable condition in the WPG. Surgery correction early on helps to correct this condition and prevemt blindness.
  • Cataracts: This usually occurs in older WPG’s, and can cause blindness. The eye lens becomes cloudy. Surgery is usually successful in removing the cataracts. Consult with your veterinarian if you notice cloudiness in your dog’s eyes.
  • Heart Disease: WPG’s are prone to aortic stenosis, a heart condition in which there is a partial obstruction of blood flow as the blood leaves the heart. Some symptoms may include tiredness, excess panting, fainting and, coughing. Consult with your veterinarian for more advice.

Exercise

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Lies

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon dog breed is bred from a field line, and tend to be more agile with a stronger work drive to hunt. This dog breed is easy to train, and is very gentle with people and children. They make for wonderful household companions, as long as they are exercised, positively trained, and socialized.

Some gun dogs may be more intense, and do not calm until after being exercised substantially. They will have boundless energy, and tremendous enthusiasm to play, interact, and generally have fun with everyone. This puppy -like energy may make them anxious, if not exercised properly. The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is not a sedentary type dog breed, and do not do well with apartment living. This breed needs to be out and about on farms, large equestrian properties, or homes with large gardens. They have an uncurbed need for play and exercise.

Nutrition

A high-quality diet helps your Wirehaired Pointing Griffon fight disease, grow correctly and age well. That said, with so many dog foods available, there are so many options. A high-quality dog food has the power to heal; yet that healing is totally dependent on the quality of the ingredients in each dog food recipe. Dog food recipes are also constantly changing, and it’s up to every dog parent to read the ingredient label carefully.

Most of us understand the importance of eating healthily, but many don’t fully understand that this applies to our dogs, too. Vitamins and amino acids should not be synthetic, and organic should mean that all of the ingredients are organic, including vitamins and minerals, and not just a few. A well-balanced dog food should use real meat as its first ingredient. It should also not use harmful preservatives, flavors or artificial colors. This is what to look out for when choosing a dog food formula:

  • Simplest, and most nutritious ingredients
  • Look for high-quality ingredients such as whole meats, fruits, vegetables, and grains.
  • Take heed of the different ratio of macronutrients- proteins, fats and carbs!
  • General ingredients that include whole meats, fruits or vegetables in their top 5 ingredients are considered good foods.
  • Those that also incorporate antioxidants like blueberries, cranberries, pomegranates and pumpkin are also becoming popular.
  • With that said, organic, natural and preservative-free with no artificial ingredients, are also key to a well-balanced, and high quality dog food.
  • Next, you’ll have to try out which one works best for your dog. Providing your WPG with the most appropriate diet that is healthy and beneficial to his life stage will help you give your dog a long and healthy life! Consult with your veterinarian for the best nutritional advice, most especially if your Wirehaired Pointing Griffon has a medical condition!

Grooming

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon hardly sheds. This breed has a harsh outercoat, and also a soft and insulating undercoat. The coat may need to be hand-stripped, to allow for growth of a new coat. Professional clipping and grooming works for this dog breed. This breed needs to be brushed every day to remove loose hair and dirt. Your WPG should enjoy being groomed.

As with all dogs, grooming needs to start during puppyhood. Use a mild canine shampoo for bathing, followed by a conditioner for dogs. With the WPG, make sure he’s soaked all the way to his skin when working in the shampoo, and begin by rinsing, starting from the head down. Shampoo needs to be rinsed off properly, otherwise dogs will itch later on.

Teeth need to be brushed daily with a canine toothbrush and canine toothpaste. Ears cleaned regularly, and checked for sensitivity. The WPG has drop ears, and may be prone to ear infections. Nails trimmed as needed. Your dog will need to have a professional dental cleaning twice a year. Consult with your veterinarian for advice.

Adopting a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Puppy

Before adopting a Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, it’s best to make sure that the entire family is on the same page! As to whether to adopt a puppy or adult, it may take longer finding a pup to adopt from a shelter. That said, adult WPG’s have superb temperaments, and make for an easy adoption, if you’re willing to go all the way with canine sporting activities to keep your WPG happy, healthy, and well-exercised.

Try testing your WPG’s excitability level when at the shelter, and the dog’s level of tolerance to sociability. Additionally, your WPG will probably be more excitable at the shelter because he’s not received the right amount of exercise.

Give your WPG time to adjust to his new surroundings when bringing him home, and entertain him with non-toxic, safe dog toys and healthy dog treats. This dog breed is highly intelligent, active, and are known for being runners. Supervise your WPG very carefully during the first couple of weeks, so that he does not stray when out and about at the dog park or dog beach.

As with any dog adoption, make sure that you have the time and resources to take good care of your Wirehaired Pointing Griffon.

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